History (HIS)

HIS 100 —   The Historian's Craft  (H)  (3 credits)  

Thinking, reading, research, and writing like a Historian requires a unique set of skills adaptable to academic history and a variety of careers and professions. Open to first-year students and transfers, this course teaches the technical skills necessary to become a Historian.

HIS 103 —   America to 1876  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course seeks to introduce students to American history from the age of discovery until the end of Reconstruction. Basic methods of historical study and central themes such as Americas multicultural origins, society and politics, equality and freedom, and sectional differences will be covered.

HIS 104 —   America Since 1877  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course seeks to introduce students to American history from the end of Reconstruction until today. Basic methods of historical study and central themes such as immigration, civil rights, war and social change, and political transformations will be discussed.

HIS 105 —   Introduction to Africana Studies  (CD)  (3 credits)  

Introductory historical, methodological, and interdisciplinary approach to the dispersal of African people, culture, and identity in the Americas, Europe and Asia from antiquity to the present with an emphasis on culture, policy and contemporary issues. This course acquaints students with the nature of Africana Studies as a field of intellectual inquiry.

HIS 107 —   World History to 1200  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course provides a survey of major historical developments in world history from prehistory to 1500. It aims to familiarize students with the interaction and development of civilizations on a global scale through an examination of cultural exchanges and conflict, technological developments, the impact of environmental change, geography, and global commerce.

HIS 108 —   The Modern World  (CD)  (3 credits)  

In this course, students will explore major themes in world history from the sixteenth century to the present. Topics include imperialism and changing models of political organization, the rise of national- ism, international trade routes and globalization, and the role that new technology plays in historical events.

HIS 199 —   USA in Contemp World  (USH)  (3 credits)  

Interpretive overview of developments affecting America and Americans during the turbulent years since World War II. Examines the nation's rise as a global superpower, the expanding role of central government, and related political, economic, scientific, social, and cultural developments. Provides perspectives on our future by evaluating the impact of developments on fundamental American values.

HIS 200 —   Intro Research  (3 credits)  

This course focuses on doing research in the discipline of history. Research theory, research technique, and evaluation of sources are stressed. Students work in all of the following areas: topic selection, source location, source evaluation, structural integrity of a report, elements of style, technology, and appropriate use and citation of sources. Required of all history and social studies majors usually during their sophomore year.

HIS 201 —   Hitler & Third Reich  (H)  (3 credits)  

Study of the developments which led to Nazi dictatorship. Topics discussed will include Germany's intellectual background, the role of Adolph Hitler, and the political, social, and economic factors which caused the rise and fall of the Third Reich.

HIS 204 —   Intro to Public History  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course acquaints students with the roles that museums, museum workers, and public historians play in the United States, both in the past and present times. Students participate as interns at public history sites in the community, and have a chance to create a public history project.

HIS 205 —   Independent Reserch  (H)  (3 credits)  

Special archival, reading, or field research projects arranged individually between student and instructor. Open to all students by permission of instructor.

HIS 206 —   Global Revolutions  (SS)  (3 credits)  

This course is a comparative study of revolutions and revolutionary epochs in modern European history. It aims to analyze the origins, dynamics, and consequences of the revolutions that have shaped Europe and the world.

HIS 220 —   Africa in World History  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course provides a survey of major historical developments in African history from pre-history to the present. It aims to familiarize students with African interaction in global history through an introductory discussion of the human origins debate, regional developments, the spread of Islam, colonialism and neocolonialism, economic and political change, and the globalization of African culture.

HIS 222 —   Rivalries: Central Asia & Afghanistan  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course studies the Central Asian history with its social, political, economic, and cultural aspects. Studying the early indigenous societies and their evolution through the Islamic, Mongolian, and Russian/Soviet influences present a perspective that combines both the local and global forces that shaped today's Central Asia and Afghanistan.

HIS 262 —   Vietnam War  (H)  (3 credits)  

America's Vietnam War was the longest our nation ever fought, lasting 25 years and spanning six presidential administrations from Truman to Ford. This course explores the reasons for our involvement, the ways we fought the war, why it lasted so long, and why it culminated in an American defeat. Probed within this context are the Vietnamese social revolution, the antiwar movement within American society, events in Southeast Asia since 1975 when the United States withdrew, and the historical lessons to be learned from the war.

HIS 270 —   Living With the Bomb  (CD)  (3 credits)  

Examines the effects that nuclear weapons have had on Asian international relations from WWII to today. Pays particular attention to nuclear proliferation over the past decade and the potential repercussions this might have during the 21st century.

HIS 272 —   New York State History  (H)  (3 credits)  

Empire State refers to New York State's vast geographic expanse and economic power. This course investigates the state's development into an empire from before European contact to the 21st century. Students will learn about the state's history, its continuous multicultural nature, and the tension between economic development and environmental conservation.

HIS 273 —   African American Survey  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course follows the rise of modern black American society from the trauma of the slave trade and slavery through the dramatic struggle for freedom in the present era. Basic topics will be complemented by study of the emergence of Afro-American culture ? art, music and literature.

HIS 274 —   American Military History  (H)  (3 credits)  

Examines the development of the American military establishment from colonial times to the present, with special emphasis on its relationship to society, the evolution of war, joint operations, the progression of military professionalism in the United States and the military thought, ideals and strategies of selected American adversaries.

HIS 276 —   Contemporary Japan  (CD)  (3 credits)  

Examines Japan since 1945 with emphasis on the U.S. Occupation and security alliance; the use and misuse of historical analogies in understanding Japan, Inc.; the bubble economy of the 1990s; the globalization of Japanese pop culture and technology; and the trauma and legacies of 3/11.

HIS 280 —   Asia-Pacific World  (H)  (3 credits)  

Provides in images and print a historical introduction to modern Asia. Wars, revolutions, social change, economic growth and outstanding human figures are seen in stories of how China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Indonesia and other peoples struggled to become modern nations that challenge Western economic, legal, and military supremacy.

HIS 285 —   Arab-Israeli Conflict  (CD)  (3 credits)  

In this course, students will examine one of the most volatile disputes in the contemporary world, with an emphasis on its larger historical context: the Zionist movement in Europe, Palestine under the Ottomans and the British Mandate, contemporary Israeli and Palestinian politics, and the role of outside and regional actors.

HIS 290 —   World Terrorism  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course examines the history of modern terrorism. Starting with the radicals of the French Revolution and ending with the current crisis in the Middle East, the course analyzes the paradoxical link between terror and the quest for ?progress,? ?democracy,? and ?freedom.? It also examines terrorism as an extreme form of protest against industrialization, and the perceived breakdown of ?traditional? values.

HIS 291 —   Topic:  (3 credits)  

This course will either 1) provide historical context for a topic of contemporary significance or 2) explore new developments in an emerging field of historical inquiry. May be taken up to three times with different course material.

HIS 300 —   Great Historians and Issues  (H)  (3 credits)  

Readings on issues of major historical significance which reflect the historians? diverse approaches to the discipline. An essential course for students contemplating doing advanced study in the discipline of history.

HIS 303 —   The Renaissance  (GH)  (3 credits)  

An exploration of the intellectual, cultural, religious, and political influence of humanism in Italy and Western Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries. Focus will be the literary and artistic contributions made by Renaissance ?greats? such as Dante, Petrarch, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo.

HIS 304 —   The Reformation  (H)  (3 credits)  

A study of the religious revolution in the 16th century as expressed in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and their historical ramifications. Topics will include the Renaissance Papacy, Luther and Germany, Calvinism, the Anabaptists, and the Jesuits.

HIS 305 —   History of England to 1688  (H)  (3 credits)  

A survey of English society's development from the Roman invasions through 1688. Topics will include the Roman period in Britain, the Anglo-Saxons, the Norman invasion, medieval England, the Tudor-Stuart period, and the Glorious Revolution. The development of the parliamentary system in Britain and the English monarchy will be stressed. Recommended for prelaw majors.

HIS 306 —   Modern Britain  (H)  (3 credits)  

A survey of English society's development from 1688 to the present. Topics will include Georgian and Victorian England, the industrial revolution, the impact of the world wars, and the rise of the Labour Party. The growth of the British Empire and debates over parliamentary and social reform will be stressed. Recommended for prelaw majors.

HIS 308 —   The French Revolution and Napoleon  (H)  (3 credits)  

Examination of the political and social aspects of the French Revolution and the rise, enactment, and overthrow of the Napoleonic system in Europe. Emphasis will be placed on studies of social composition, personalities, and artistic developments during this era.

HIS 309 —   Nineteenth Century Europe  (H)  (3 credits)  

A study of the political, social, economic and cultural events from the Congress of Vienna, through the periods of Italian and German unification, to the Imperialistic Age at the eve of World War I. Trends such as conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and romanticism will be examined.

HIS 310 —   World Wars in Global Context  (H)  (3 credits)  

Examines the political, diplomatic, economic, and cultural origins as well as key events and decisions of World War I, Great Depression, and World War II in global context. Emphasizes the experiences and expectations that twice led peoples across the globe to savagely wage war and peace in the early twentieth century.

HIS 311 —   Contemporary Europe  (H)  (3 credits)  

The course will examine the European political, social, and economic scene from the post-World War II period of reconstruction to the present. Topics of discussion will include the Cold War, the impact of totalitarianism and democracy on world affairs, the fall of Communism, and the creation of the European Union.

HIS 316 —   The Holocaust  (H)  (3 credits)  

Examination of the annihilation of 6 million Jewish people and millions of innocent others as a result of Nazi policies which legalized discrimination, allowing prejudice, hatred, and, ultimately, mass murder to occur.

HIS 321 —   History of Russia  (H)  (3 credits)  

A comprehensive study of Tsarist Russia emphasizing the essential determinants fostering the revolution of 1917.

HIS 322 —   History of the Soviet Union  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course explores the political, ideological, social, cultural, economic, and military aspects of Soviet history from the 1917 Revolution to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Themes include the Russian revolutions, the Stalinist system, its multinational structure, daily life, and factors that led to Russia today. Various approaches within historiography will also be discussed.

HIS 338 —   The Atlantic World, 1400-1760  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course investigates the development of the Atlantic basin from the emergence of a European borderland in the western hemisphere to the eve of the Age of Revolutions. It focuses on the movement of people, commodities, and ideas between Africa, Europe, and North and South America, and the often violent encounters that arose from the integration and development of the Atlantic world. Important topics include exploration and colonization, cultural negotiation and identity, the emergence of the plantation complex and race-based slavery, resistance to empire, and capitalism.

HIS 340 —   American Revolutionary War  (H)  (3 credits)  
Prerequisite Take HIS*103

This course evaluates the social, economic, political, and religious transformations experienced during the Revolutionary era. Individuals and broad cultural and social trends illustrate how the Revolution was more than a political or military event. This course asks whether or not America became more or less open and democratic between 1754 and 1826.

HIS 342 —   Growth of American Democracy  (H)  (3 credits)  
Prerequisite Take HIS*103

America changed dramatically during the early nineteenth century. This course will describe and evaluate the change based on the experiences of everyday Americans, especially women, African Americans, and Indians. It analyzes the democratization of politics, cultural development, the ?Market Revolution?, reform movements, and territorial expansion. Conflict and anxiety dominate the period.

HIS 343 —   The Civil War Era, 1850-1877  (H)  (3 credits)  

The Civil War defines what both separates and unites the American nation. This course analyzes the war's causes, the experience of war, why people fought, reuniting the nation, and the war's continued legacy. Battles and military strategy appear only as they inform the war's social, cultural and political importance.

HIS 344 —   America in the Industrial Age  (H)  (3 credits)  
Prerequisite Take HIS*103

Interpretative analysis of modern America's emergence during the late 19th century, including the rise of industrialism, immigration, urban and rural dislocations, and governmental responses.

HIS 346 —   Black Freedom Movement  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course examines the long arc of the Civil Rights Movement; exploring the major campaigns, organizations, and guiding themes of the modern Black freedom movement while acknowledging the role of less-publicized grassroots activism. We will analyze major debates regarding Black Power and Civil Rights, placing both in their proper context.

HIS 347 —   Contemporary Problems: Domestic  (SS)  (3 credits)  

A problems approach to selected domestic issues facing American society today, historical backgrounds, current contours, and proposed solutions.

HIS 348 —   Contemporary Problems: Foreign  (SS)  (3 credits)  

A problems approach to selected foreign affairs issues facing American society today, historical backgrounds, current contours, and proposed solutions.

HIS 354 —   Origins of the Urban Crisis  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Examines the evolution of the American city from the colonial period to the present. The course explores the changing role of the city in national development and the city's responses to problems associated with those changes. The transformation of the American city into an industrial center is stressed, as is the emergence of the modern metropolis and the unprecedented megalopolis.

HIS 355 —   Women in American History  (CD)  (3 credits)  

Students are introduced to American women's history from colonial times to the present. Students are exposed to what famous and ordinary women did, what they were told to do, and the tension between the two. Attention is paid to the intersections of race, class, and ethnicity in women's experiences.

HIS 357 —   Early American Foreign Policy  (H)  (3 credits)  

An interpretive and descriptive study of American foreign policy from colonial times to World War I; its theory, practice, and results, with emphasis on US use of law and diplomacy to navigate a system of more powerful states.

HIS 358 —   Modern American Foreign Policy  (H)  (3 credits)  

An interpretive and descriptive study of American foreign policy from World War I to the present. America's emergence as a global power in modern times, the nexus of domestic and foreign affairs, and the legal dimensions of US power are highlighted.

HIS 359 —   Canada and U.S. Relations  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course explores the historical relations of the Canadian and American nations and examines the major determinants influencing their interrelationship since the late eighteenth century. The purpose of this course is twofold: 1) to familiarize students with the major events that have shaped Canadian-American relations, and 2) to use Canadian-American history as an analytical model for exploring international relationships.

HIS 360 —   African American Women  (CD)  (3 credits)  

The contributions of African American women have been long overlooked in American history. This course will address the lives of black women from the 1600s through the twenty-first century. Specifically, students will learn about African American women's experiences in freedom, slavery, domesticity, commerce, politics, religion, and social movements.

HIS 361 —   Ottomans and Modern Turkey  (CD)  (3 credits)  

This course examines the dynamics that shaped governance, society, and culture in the Middle East and the Balkans under the Ottoman Empire from 1300-1923, and its successor, the modern Republic of Turkey, the first secular and democratic state with t predominantly Muslim population.

HIS 371 —   The Middle East  (H)  (3 credits)  

Change and continuity in Southwest Asia and North Africa from the rise of Islam to the nineteenth century with emphasis on the relationship with the West and the challenge of modernity. Considers the evolution of Islamic civilization, Western imperialism, the development of nationalism, and intellectual currents.

HIS 372 —   The Modern Middle East  (CD)  (3 credits)  

In this course students will examine major issues in the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the modern Middle East from the early nineteenth century to the present.

HIS 374 —   Modern Africa  (H)  (3 credits)  

A study of the crucial issues of the colonial and post-colonial periods in east Africa. Study of the economic, social, and religious revolutions in African societies, and consideration of resistance and freedom struggles including the Mau Mau rebellion.

HIS 375 —   Modern China  (H)  (3 credits)  

The people of China and their massive social revolution from its origins to the quest today for national power and an egalitarian society. Interdisciplinary approach: literature, geography, economics, politics, and science from a historical perspective.

HIS 376 —   Modern Japan  (H)  (3 credits)  

The people of Japan and their successful transition from feudal society to modern national and global economic power today. Interdisciplinary approach: literature, geography, economics, politics, and psychology from a historical perspective.

HIS 379 —   U.S. Latin American History  (H)  (3 credits)  

Latin America and the United States share a long history of social, political, economic, and religious interaction. Negotiated borders and the impact of power dynamics on nations south of the border are explored. Students will learn about settlers of the U.S. and Latin America, including Africans, Europeans, and indigenous peoples, acknowledging all helped to shape this shared history.

HIS 390 —   Special Topics in History  (H)  (3 credits)  

This course will examine in detail a topic of theme that is not ordinarily offered by the History Department that falls within a faculty members expertise. Emphasis will be placed on reading recent scholarship in an emerging field of study. May be taken up to three times with different course material.

HIS 399 —   Independent Study  (3 credits)  

Individual reading on research in special topics mutually agreeable to student and tutor. Open to students by permission of chairperson. Arranged individually.

HIS 400 —   Senior Seminar  (WI)  (3 credits)  

Research seminar designed to stress primary sources, evoke in-depth research, and produce from each participant a solid paper worthy of a bachelor's degree. Topics selected in harmony with student interest and instructor preference. Required of all history majors during their senior year.

HIS 403 —   Honors Thesis I  (3 credits)  

Individual research of substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

HIS 404 —   Honors Thesis II  (WI)  (3 credits)  

Individual research of substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

HIS 493 —   History Internship  (3-6 credits)  

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking an internship or co-op should talk to their adviser.

HIS 494 —   History Internship  (3-6 credits)  

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking an internship or co-op should talk to their adviser.