Political Science (POL)

POL 101 —   American Govt  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Study of the essentials of American government; Congress; the presidency; the federal judiciary; principles of federalism; separation of powers, and the federal regulatory system.

POL 103 —   International Issues  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An introduction to the major issues facing the international political system. The course will focus on the problems of war, nuclear weapons, underdevelopment, food and population, science and technology, human rights, and nationalism as they currently affect world politics.

POL 105 —   Comparative Govt  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Examination of topics in comparative political analysis. The impact of indigenous values, beliefs, and attitudes upon political behavior. Materials will be drawn from a variety of systems and the cultures with emphasis on the Western.

POL 111 —   Fundamentals of Justice  (SS)  (3 credits)  

This course will examine justice from environmental, social, and legal perspectives. It will introduce students to advocacy and organizing principles and techniques by examining transformative movements, inspirational writings, and efforts for collective liberation. The overriding goal is to help students understand actions and strategies for change.

POL 200 —   Political Science Practical Seminar  (SS)  (3 credits)  
Prerequisite take pol*101;

This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic analysis of politics. Methods of critical investigation are applied to research topics determined by the student; issues related to the research question and approaches to answering the question are examined. Students will research career options, internship opportunities, study abroad programs, and develop strategies for pursuing these opportunities.

POL 201 —   American Pol Thought  (H)  (3 credits)  

A study of the historical and contemporary ideas underlying the creation and development of American liberal democracy. The political and social thought of the system's most ardent advocates and critics will be examined as a way of discovering both the ideological bases of some of the most important issues of our time and the power of interest groups to co-opt or defeat ideological preferences.

POL 203 —   Introduction to Law  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An introduction to American law and legal institutions as a part of government. The course will survey generally the sources and functions of law as a mediator between the individual and the society of government; and between the various orders of society: political, economic, and social. The course will examine, in general terms, the various kinds of law - civil, environmental, criminal, constitutional, etc. - focusing on selected problems in these areas to determine the capacity and limitations of law and legal processes to deal with social problems.

POL 204 —   International Regions  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An introduction to the various regions of the world, focusing upon their conflicting perspectives on international issues. The course is a survey of the factors which have created the world views and current foreign policy preferences of the different regions: Europe, Russia, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.

POL 220 —   Women and the Law  (SS)  (3 credits)  

A historical and legal overview of women in the American justice system. Emphasis on the equal protection arguments, remedies for discrimination, evolving concepts in the law of rape, consumer rights, and employment practices.

POL 230 —   Women in Politics  (SS)  (3 credits)  

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the growing field of women and politics, specifically women and politics in the United States. Specific topics include the origins and goals of the women's movements, political participation by women in citizen level activities, women elected and appointed officials in government, and public policy goals and accomplishments of the women's movements.

POL 241 —   Public Policy  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of what government chooses to do about current public problems: how those problems originate, how policies are devised and implemented, and what their consequences are; an examination of specific policies including housing, health, welfare, education, environment, energy, defense and tax policy.

POL 242 —   State and Local Gov  (SS)  (3 credits)  

The study of sub-national politics as process and systems with emphasis on intergovernmental relations.

POL 271 —   Politics Thr Lit  (H)  (3 credits)  

The study of politics and political concepts as they appear in contemporary literature.

POL 282 —   Canadian Politics  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of the Canadian political system with special emphasis on the political culture, elites, the basis of partisanship, and the role of the parties. Comparisons with Britain and the United States will be stressed with special emphasis on contemporary U.S.-Canada linkages.

POL 285 —   US Foreign Policy  (SS)  (3 credits)  

American foreign policy, its formation and execution; principal factors underlying American foreign relations. Emphasis on contemporary foreign policy.

POL 286 —   After the Cold War  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An examination of the linkage between domestic politics and American foreign policy following the end of the Cold War. Emphasis is on the attempts of policy makers, planners, interest groups, academics, and the press to shape or direct policy. Case studies will include U.S. policy toward China, Japan, Germany, Cuba, Canada, and Iran.

POL 288 —   Russian Foreign Policy  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Examines the evolution of the Russian state since 1917; the linkage between ideology and nationalism, and between domestic and foreign policy. Emphasis on Russian foreign policy since 1990.

POL 301 —   Political Philosophy  (H)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of the contributions and concepts of the major political philosophies from Plato to Machiavelli, and an assessment of their relevance to the understanding of contemporary political systems. Comparisons with modern political theories.

POL 304 —   Mod Pol Ideologies  (H)  (3 credits)  

A comparative study of important contemporary ideological currents and their relationship to political events: liberalism, conservatism, socialism, communism, fascism, and nationalism.

POL 306 —   Feminist Polit. Theory  (H)  (3 credits)  

Feminism is a movement whose goal is to attain the full equality of women. Feminist theory in particular focuses upon the nature of the oppression of women and argues that the liberation of women will bring about radical changes in society and its values. It assumes that throughout history, the roles women have played and the images held about women have been shaped by men. In the process, women became alienated, viewing themselves in a mirror made for them by men. They accepted a false set of images - a false ideology - and they identify with it.

POL 325 —   Urban Politics & Planning  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An inquiry into urban planning and political institutions with special emphasis on topics such as political participation and public policy formation, and their bearing upon governmental problems in metropolitan areas.

POL 328 —   Political Party/Elec  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of political party activity and interest groups in political systems with special emphasis on the American experience. The nature of the two party system, types of party systems; national, state and local; the social bases of partisanship; party organization; leadership, strategy, the campaign, the convention. Parties and interest groups will be studied as participants in the making of public policy decisions.

POL 331 —   Public Admin  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Theory, principles, processes, and practice of public administration. The relation of private enterprise to the public policy. The study of the function of bureaucracies and administrative leadership in political systems in terms of recent theories of administrative behavior and decision making.

POL 332 —   Congressnl Politics  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of decision-making in legislative bodies. Major emphasis on the American Congress, with comparative materials from state legislatures and non-American political systems.

POL 334 —   The Presidency  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Formation and development of the office of the president. Selected cases in the exercise of presidential power.

POL 337 —   Ethics and Politics  (H)  (3 credits)  

Studies the responsibilities of public officials and citizens together with the social responsibilities of states. Political issues with ethical ramifications will be treated, such as: corruption in government, capital punishment, the congressional code of ethics, espionage, legalized abortion, tax evasion, civil disobedience, and others. Emphasis is on the case study approach.

POL 338 —   Politics Church & Stat  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An examination of the relationship of church and state in its theological, constitutional, cultural, and secular totality. Emphasis will be on the evolution of this relationship with selected topics of current concern such as the politics of church-related education.

POL 354 —   Constitutional Law  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of the development of American constitutional law and its effects on the distribution of political power. Use of Supreme Court cases to examine the nature of judicial review, the distribution of powers between the national and state governments, and the relative powers of the president, the Congress, and the Supreme Court.

POL 355 —   Civil Liberties  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of the rights and liberties of individuals in terms of constitutional doctrine. Use of Supreme Court cases to examine contemporary issues of freedom of speech and press, search and seizure, self-incrimination, right of counsel, sexual and racial discrimination, and privacy.

POL 358 —   Amer Judic Process  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of American courts which focuses on the nature of judicial power, the structure of the judicial system, the appointment of judges, the bases of judicial decisions, and the political consequences of judicial actions which centers on the Supreme Court.

POL 360 —   Politics of European Dem  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Area focus on the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and the emerging Eastern European democracies. Comparison made also with the smaller Western European countries, Canada and the United States. Course objective is to identify and compare similarities and differences within the mature industrial democracies on the basis of social structure, culture and parties, policy making and administration, interest group activities, and economic policies and approaches to social welfare.

POL 362 —   Political Development  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An examination of politics and processes of development and change in the emerging countries of Africa, Latin America, and Asia. The comparative analysis of internal and external threats to governmental growth and societal stability will expose the student to possible paths of structural change, modernization, and dependency.

POL 368 —   Revolutions & Leaders  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Examination of revolution as an empirical concept. The stages of revolutionary change, the politics of violence, and the characteristics of revolutionaries.

POL 376 —   Politics/Middle East  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An analysis of the political processes of Africa and the Middle Eastern states in the environment of regional and international politics. Selected political, economic, and social problems with an emphasis on the region will be covered.

POL 378 —   Politics & Soc Latin America  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An overview of the history, culture, and the contemporary political processes of Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on political change, the role of the military, underdevelopment, relations with foreign powers, and the role of the church. Detailed examination of selected countries.

POL 380 —   Internatl Relations  (SS)  (3 credits)  

An inquiry to approaches to theory building in international relations with an emphasis on the problems of war and peace in the nuclear age. Included are considerations of strategic planning, game theory, deterrence, decision-making theory, and models of international dependence.

POL 386 —   International Law  (SS)  (3 credits)  

Surveys the field of international law beginning with its sources, legal nature, and sanctions; followed by the rights and duties of states and the jurisdiction over persons, territories, the sea, airspace, and outer space; concluding with the norms of neutrality and belligerency.

POL 390 —   Resrch Mthds-Pol Sci  (SS)  (3 credits)  

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of political research, specifically empirical research. The goal is to give the students a sufficient understanding and knowledge of the methods and techniques so that they may join the ranks of political scientists in this field. The topics to be discussed will cover the gamut of issues involved with empirical research: philosophical issues, measurement, statistical analysis, and survey design.

POL 398 —   Topic:  (SS)  (3 credits)  

A seminar focusing on a single conceptual area of the instructor's choice. This could be women in politics, terrorism, political economy, race and politics, urbanization, or politics and the environment. This list is not exhaustive and is intended only as suggestive in range.

POL 403 —   Honors Thesis I  (3 credits)  

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

POL 404 —   Honors Thesis II  (3 credits)  

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

POL 405 —   Political Sci. Co-op  (6.00 credits)  

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant paid employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking a co-op should talk to their adviser.

POL 406 —   Political Sci. Co-op  (6.00 credits)  

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant paid employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking a co-op should talk to their adviser.

POL 407 —   Political Sci. Co-op  (6.00 credits)  

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant paid employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking a co-op should talk to their adviser.

POL 408 —   Political Sci. Co-op  (6.00 credits)  

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant paid employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking a co-op should talk to their adviser.

POL 490 —   Research Thesis  (WI)  (3 credits)  
Prerequisite Take POL*390

This course will be an opportunity for advanced students of political science to do research within a specific subject area of the discipline. The students will be expected to apply their acquired skills (from POL 390) to the special issue of their choice. The course will be conducted as an independent research effort with each student meeting privately with his or her research project adviser(s).

POL 491 —   Internship  (6.00 credits)  

The department of political science offers various internships each semester. The number of course units and semester hours available will depend upon the circumstances of the internship. A determination of credit hours earned will be established at preregistration by the chairman of the department in consultation with the dean.

POL 495 —   Internship Albany  (9 credits)  

(Concentration: American political system).

POL 496 —   Internship Washingt  (9 credits)  

(Concentration: American political system).

POL 497 —   Internship Washingt  (3 credits)  

Seminar. (Concentration: American political system).

POL 498 —   Independent Study  (3 credits)  

Arranged individually. Can be taken multiple times for different topics.